meghb
Posts: 79
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2016 9:14 pm

Hyundai Ioniq: Tesla might have shown us the way, but Hyundai's likely to get us there

Tue Aug 02, 2016 7:11 pm

Very reassuring article for those planning to buy the car in Hyundia IONIQ forum.

Hyundai has pulled the covers off the Ioniq in Europe, a new green car that uniquely provides the choice of three power options: hybrid, electric and plug-in hybrid.

The Ioniq is not only Hyundai's first hybrid model, it's also its first electric car, as well as being a gamble that one car style is going to appeal to those looking for an alternative to conventional combustion engines. This is as much a rival to Toyota's popular Prius, as it is to Nissan's Leaf.

Like Toyota and Nissan, Hyundai is pitching the Ioniq to everybody. The Ioniq certainly makes hybrid and electric cars more accessible, undercutting the price of the established Prius, offering more practicality and appeal than the Leaf, while sticking to what Hyundai is known for - lots of standard features and long warranties, both on the car and the battery.

This makes the Ioniq more important than you might first think. It's an increase in the hybrid and electric options available, and while it might not take the headlines that Tesla does with its Silicon Valley posturing, it's likely to appeal to a good number of everyday drivers as brands like Hyundai and Kia enjoy increasing acceptability in the UK.

Tesla may have done more to popularise electric cars than any other manufacturer, but it's likely to be someone like Hyundai that puts an electric vehicle on an average drive, on an average street.

The first models to launch are the electric and hybrid versions, with plug-in hybrid to follow later in 2017.

Ioniq: Electric or Hybrid?
The Ionic Electric has a 28kWh lithium-ion polymer battery and a 120PS electric motor which offers 295Nm torque, a range of 174 miles (NEDC) and 0-62mph in 10.2 seconds, dropping to 9.9 seconds in sports mode. It consumes 11.5kWh/100km.

For many this will be a numbers game, and much as Tesla has impressed with sports car performance and anxiety-defeating range, you can't get that for the £28,995 (which should drop to £24,494 after the government grant) that Hyundai is asking. That also makes the BMW i3 look a little pricy, although, arguably, you're paying for design panache from BMW, where the Hyundai is more modest.

For the Ioniq Hybrid you'll find a 1.6-litre 105PS petrol engine mated to a 6-speed dual clutch automatic gearbox, with a 44PS, 170Nm torque electric motor and 1.56kWh lithium-ion polymer battery. The hybrid will hit 62mph in 10.8 seconds, but the important figure is 83.1mpg and CO2 emissions of 79g/km, with power recouped through regenerative braking.

The Ioniq Hybrid is competitively priced too, starting at £19,995 for the SE trim. With that you get aircon, autonomous emergency braking, adaptive cruise control, lane assistance, rear parking sensors and camera, Bluetooth, the 5-inch LCD touch display and plenty more. In that sense, this is a fully-loaded car even at that sub-£20k asking price. The Electric comes in Premium and Premium SE trim levels, so you get all that, plus things like wireless phone charging, heated seats, satnav, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay and more.

The Ioniq plug-in hybrid hasn't been fully specified yet, but will boost the battery to 8.9kWh, letting you cruise for up to 30 miles on electric alone. Prices will be confirmed closer to launch in 2017.

Both the Ioniq Electric and Ioniq Hybrid will be available from 13 October 2016, providing a good dab of practicality and affordability in the eco sector.

ioniqfan
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 5:13 pm

Re: Hyundai Ioniq: Tesla might have shown us the way, but Hyundai's likely to get us there

Wed Aug 03, 2016 8:34 pm

Hyundai is doing a remarkable job in promoting green technologies in cars.

Lisbon
Posts: 69
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 9:01 am

Re: Hyundai Ioniq: Tesla might have shown us the way, but Hyundai's likely to get us there

Fri Aug 05, 2016 4:05 pm

Are they doing anything about battery recycling?

hstyles
Posts: 55
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2016 11:51 pm

Re: Hyundai Ioniq: Tesla might have shown us the way, but Hyundai's likely to get us there

Sun Aug 07, 2016 7:39 pm

Elon Musk has changed the auto industry. He has shown that electric cars are the future and Hyundai IONIQ is a great step towards eco friendly cars.

sam
Posts: 131
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:39 pm

Re: Hyundai Ioniq: Tesla might have shown us the way, but Hyundai's likely to get us there

Tue Aug 09, 2016 4:16 pm

I would have to disagree Hyundai is making some technology changes projected in the near future they do have a fantastic warranty that they're known for the car looks absolutely sleek and great but their technology is just a little bit behind

aidan
Posts: 121
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:36 pm

Re: Hyundai Ioniq: Tesla might have shown us the way, but Hyundai's likely to get us there

Tue Aug 09, 2016 5:02 pm

Hyundai has a lot of good things going for it give it time to reach its technological potential bringing that technology to its vehicles and it may be a front-runner

new2evs
Posts: 70
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2016 8:16 pm

Re: Hyundai Ioniq: Tesla might have shown us the way, but Hyundai's likely to get us there

Sat Sep 10, 2016 2:05 am

Hyundai is really pushing for that top spot

The 200-Mile Electric Car Field Could be Crowded by 2018
By Steph Willems on June 2, 2016

2017 IONIQ HEV

If you’re still holding on to that copy of Who Killed the Electric Car? you bought back in your university days, it might be time to toss it in the trash.

In just two years, there could be four 200-plus mile electric vehicles on the market, now that Hyundai plans to jump into the long-range EV game.

The South Korean automaker doesn’t want to be an also-ran in the emerging field, so it’s planning a 2018 introduction of an EV designed to battle the 215-mile Tesla Model 3. It’s an ambitious goal for a company whose green car chief once called EVs and hybrids “a headache.”

Reuters reports Hyundai wants a vehicle that goes at least 200 miles on a charge, putting it on par with the Model 3 (due out in late 2017), the Chevrolet Bolt (due out this fall), and the next-generation Nissan Leaf, which is expected to receive a similar range in 2018.

In April, Ford CEO Mark Fields said his company was developing a 200-mile EV, even after his electrification chief said the 100-mile range of the 2017 Focus Electric was good enough. There’s no word on when that model will appear.

Apparently, automakers decided 200 miles is enough range to eliminate most cases of “range anxiety” and be useful for most driving tasks. It’s also a nice, round number and is achievable with existing technology.

Hyundai hasn’t been resting on its electric laurels this whole time. Earlier this year, the company revealed its 2017 Ioniq, which comes in hybrid, plug-in and fully electric versions. The Ioniq Electric will have an estimate range of 110 miles when it goes on sale later this year.

Whether the automaker’s shadowy 200-mile EV is a new model or a battery-crammed version of the Ioniq remains to be seen.

Lisbon
Posts: 69
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 9:01 am

Re: Hyundai Ioniq: Tesla might have shown us the way, but Hyundai's likely to get us there

Sun Sep 11, 2016 3:35 pm

new2evs wrote:Hyundai is really pushing for that top spot

The 200-Mile Electric Car Field Could be Crowded by 2018
By Steph Willems on June 2, 2016

2017 IONIQ HEV

If you’re still holding on to that copy of Who Killed the Electric Car? you bought back in your university days, it might be time to toss it in the trash.

In just two years, there could be four 200-plus mile electric vehicles on the market, now that Hyundai plans to jump into the long-range EV game.

The South Korean automaker doesn’t want to be an also-ran in the emerging field, so it’s planning a 2018 introduction of an EV designed to battle the 215-mile Tesla Model 3. It’s an ambitious goal for a company whose green car chief once called EVs and hybrids “a headache.”

Reuters reports Hyundai wants a vehicle that goes at least 200 miles on a charge, putting it on par with the Model 3 (due out in late 2017), the Chevrolet Bolt (due out this fall), and the next-generation Nissan Leaf, which is expected to receive a similar range in 2018.

In April, Ford CEO Mark Fields said his company was developing a 200-mile EV, even after his electrification chief said the 100-mile range of the 2017 Focus Electric was good enough. There’s no word on when that model will appear.

Apparently, automakers decided 200 miles is enough range to eliminate most cases of “range anxiety” and be useful for most driving tasks. It’s also a nice, round number and is achievable with existing technology.

Hyundai hasn’t been resting on its electric laurels this whole time. Earlier this year, the company revealed its 2017 Ioniq, which comes in hybrid, plug-in and fully electric versions. The Ioniq Electric will have an estimate range of 110 miles when it goes on sale later this year.

Whether the automaker’s shadowy 200-mile EV is a new model or a battery-crammed version of the Ioniq remains to be seen.



You should make it a new thread in the Gneral Hyundai IONIQ Forum section.

voltage
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2016 8:16 pm

Re: Hyundai Ioniq: Tesla might have shown us the way, but Hyundai's likely to get us there

Wed Sep 14, 2016 2:51 am

If I'm correct my statement is coming from a discussion with a group of people from a work event but they were saying that Tesla is thinking about putting solar panels on its vehicle to increase the energy power longevity and duration and somebody else was saying that other high-end vehicles have also started discussing this and implementing it has anyone heard any other news about this?

sam
Posts: 131
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:39 pm

Re: Hyundai Ioniq: Tesla might have shown us the way, but Hyundai's likely to get us there

Thu Sep 15, 2016 4:30 am

I don't think Tesla is going to be the competition anymore because the Chevy Bolt came out with some very impressive mileage and features

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